Netflix vs PureFlix

When netflix videos like Big Mouth trailer cannot be taken down from youtube while videos revealing the truth behind the white race are routinely blocked, it is time to fight back. We unsubscribed from Netflix well over a year ago.
I would just add to the article below that for some of those that have all the money they want, business can be much more than the bottom line. It can be about destroying values in order to weaken a nation to make it fall. Watch the trailer of Big Mouth and ask yourself if the creators of this are after your money or your soul or maybe your country.

Quotes:

  • Greg Gudorf believes movies and TV shows don’t need to be riddled with sex, violence, and inappropriate language to be entertaining. In fact, they can even be inspirational.
  • The averag e adult in the US is involved in more than 11 hours of media a day, whether it’s online media or TV. Estimates are that by the age of 17, the average child will have consumed 65,000 hours of media, compared to about 11,000 hours that the child will spend in school and more than 32 times the number of hours they will spend with a parent.
  • “I can’t help but be frightened by what we’re doing to our children with such a media diet,” he said. “Parents who choose Christian entertainment are protecting the minds and hearts of their children. We can choose to either rail against what the mainstream media puts out and go with nothing, or we can rail against it and find something positiv e.
  • In the 1930s, ‘40s and ‘50s, the Church heavily influenced the movie-making industry: “whether you were 5 or 95, you could go to the theater together and watch a movie,” Gudorf said…In the early ‘60s, however, the Church pulled out of Hollywood – and the meteoric rise in sex and violence seen in movies since then is undeniable

  • there are studies that show that PG-13 and cleaner content actually produces more revenue than R-rated content.
  • nothing will truly change until the Church – the universal body of Christ – once again gets involved in the conversation.
  • “For so long, the Church has warned against the dangers of media and preached that we should move away from it,” he explained. “Bu t, our human nature is we’re hooked, we’re addicted. You can tell an addict it’s not good for them, but unless you show the addict an alternative, it becomes difficult. Of course, the Church has got the best alternative in the simple words of Jesus Christ Himself. In the media world, we want to make sure those messages come through.”
  • For parents seeking to give their families a clean, uplifting alternative to much of what Hollywood puts out, PureFlix.com is offering a free one-month trial to its video streaming services with thousands of titles.

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Gnosticism – 5b. The Origins of Gnosticism

5b. The origins of Gnosticism.  

[From the previous post: No one has yet shown, however, that the Gnostic Redeemer existed before Christian times… what fertile soil the Early Church provided for Gnostic teaching…]

The Hermetic lit., some of which is pre-Christian, with its mystical quest for illumination and rebirth, also often reminds one of some Gnostic documents; and the mystery religions (with the notorious problems of dating material which they present) afford other parallels. All this simply reflects what was indicated earlier, that Gnosticism was a natural fruit of the 2nd cent. of religious quests of the Hel. world, with its Gr. assumptions, Eastern religion, and astrological fatalism. These tendencies did not together constitute a system: but, coming into contact with a system or articulated preaching they could form one. Coming into contact with Christianity, they took the Christian Redeemer and gnosticized Him, took the Christian preaching and tore it from its OT roots, took the Biblical tradition and sought to make it answer the problems of Gr. philosophy, took the Christian convictions about the end and purged away such offensively Jewish features as resurrection and judgment. Gnosticism was parasitic, and took its shape from the system to which it attached itself. Looked at from another point of view, it was cultural, an outcome of the attempt to digest and “indigenize” Christianity. It need not surprise us, therefore, that some of the same tendencies appear in other 2nd-cent. Christians, even among those who brought about the eventual defeat of Christian Gnosticism. It may be hard for us who have been formed in another thought world, who do not have the same inbred assumptions, to understand either the attractions of the Gnostic systems, or the agonies and difficulties of many mainstream Christian theologians. It is the measure of their greatness that, sharing so much with the Gnostics intellectually as they did, by faithfulness to the historic Christ and the Biblical tradition they produced an “indigenous” Greek-Gentile Christian thought which retained the primitive preaching and the whole of the Scriptures.

Being a phenomenon arising essentially from a particular historical and cultural situation, Gnosticism was not likely to outlast that situation long. The crisis for Gnosticism prob. came with the emergence of the genuinely Iranian, radically dualistic religion of Mani (d. a.d. 277), which was spreading in the Rom. empire from the 3rd cent. onward. Manicheism must have faced many Christian Gnostics with a crucial choice: it could not long be possible to occupy a middle ground between mainstream Christianity and the books of Mani.

 

6. The sources of Gnosticism.

Until recent years the Gnostic writers were known almost entirely through the writings of their antagonists. Of these Irenaeus, Against Heresies, Hippolytus, Refutation of all Heresies, and Epiphanius, Panarion, provide extracts, often sizable, from Gnostic works. The last twenty years have seen the gradual publication of items from a Gnostic library discovered at Nag Hammadi in Egypt and containing Coptic tr. of works of very diverse character. These include as well many works further from the Christian tradition, and some Manichean ones, the Gospel of Truth of (prob.) Valentinus and a Gospel of Thomas consisting of sayings attributed to the risen Lord and including a number of Gnosticized variants on synoptic sayings. While there is much still to be done in the study of these documents, the conclusion which emerges so far is that the early fathers, for all their trenchancy of language, hardly give a misleading impression.

 

Bibliography

H. E. W. Turner, The Pattern of Christian Truth (1954); R. Bultmann, Primitive Christianity in its Original Setting (Eng. tr. 1956); R. McL. Wilson, The Gnostic Problem (1958); R. M. Grant, Reader in Gnosticism (1961); H. Jonas, The Gnostic Religion, 2nd ed. (1963); R. M. Grant, Gnosticism and Early Christianity, 2nd ed. (1966); R. McL. Wilson, Gnosis and the New Testament (1968); W. Schmithals, The Office of Apostle in the Early Church (Eng. trs. 1971) 114-230.

Source: https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/encyclopedia-of-the-bible/Gnosticism

 

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Gnosticism – 5a. The Origins of Gnosticism

5a. The origins of Gnosticism.  

Continental scholars have often argued that Gnosticism is of pre-Christian origin, the figure of a cosmic redeemer being taken over from Eastern, specifically Iranian, sources, which are also the prime source of its dualism. Some would even see the essence of Gentile (indeed, Pauline) Christianity as the superimposition of the Gnostic Redeemer on the historical Jesus. No one has yet shown, however, that the Gnostic Redeemer existed before Christian times, and the Qumran documents have shown that Pauline and Johannine language about knowledge was firmly rooted in Jewish tradition. R. M. Grant has even suggested that Gnosticism itself is of Jewish origin: the fruit of unorthodox speculation working upon an apocalyptic framework which the fall of Jerusalem in a.d. 70 had caused to be re-evaluated. Certainly the Nag Hammadi documents suggest the effect of Jewish speculation. The “Colossian heresy” combined Jewish and ascetic features, philosophical activity, and veneration of astral powers (Col 2:16-23), and when Paul speaks of the whole pleroma dwelling in Christ (Col 1:19), it is tempting to see him taking the word which the Gnostics used of their scheme of intermediary beings, disinfecting it and replacing it, as it were, by Christ. But neither the Colossians nor the Corinthians, nor the groups attacked in the Pastoral epistles or 1 John, display a Gnostic system of the type reflected in the 2nd-cent. movements. The Corinthians delighted unduly in knowledge (1 Cor 8:1; 13:8) and wisdom (1 Cor 1:17ff.), were unhappy about the thought of resurrection (1 Cor 15), included both those who questioned whether a Christian could marry (1 Cor 7) and those whose “liberation” left them indifferent to their bodies’ actions (1 Cor 6:12-18). Others possessed “gnosis falsely so-called” (1 Tim 6:20), had mythologies and genealogies (1 Tim 1:4), spiritualized the resurrection (2 Tim 2:18), played with “Jewish fables” (Titus 1:14), and knew both severe ascetism (1 Tim 4:3) and sexual laxity (2 Tim 3:6). The elder feared the teachers of a docetic, “phantom” Christ (1 John 4:1-3). All these show what fertile soil the Early Church provided for Gnostic teaching; but show no sign of the systematized Gnosticism of the 2nd cent.

 

The Hermetic lit., some of which is pre-Christian, with its mystical quest for illumination and rebirth, also often reminds one of some Gnostic documents; and the mystery religions (with the notorious problems of dating material which they present) afford other parallels. All this simply reflects what was indicated earlier, that Gnosticism was a natural fruit of the 2nd cent. of religious quests of the Hel. world, with its Gr. assumptions, Eastern religion, and astrological fatalism. These tendencies did not together constitute a system: but, coming into contact with a system or articulated preaching they could form one. Coming into contact with Christianity, they took the Christian Redeemer and gnosticized Him, took the Christian preaching and tore it from its OT roots, took the Biblical tradition and sought to make it answer the problems of Gr. philosophy, took the Christian convictions about the end and purged away such offensively Jewish features as resurrection and judgment. Gnosticism was parasitic, and took its shape from the system to which it attached itself. Looked at from another point of view, it was cultural, an outcome of the attempt to digest and “indigenize” Christianity. It need not surprise us, therefore, that some of the same tendencies appear in other 2nd-cent. Christians, even among those who brought about the eventual defeat of Christian Gnosticism. It may be hard for us who have been formed in another thought world, who do not have the same inbred assumptions, to understand either the attractions of the Gnostic systems, or the agonies and difficulties of many mainstream Christian theologians. It is the measure of their greatness that, sharing so much with the Gnostics intellectually as they did, by faithfulness to the historic Christ and the Biblical tradition they produced an “indigenous” Greek-Gentile Christian thought which retained the primitive preaching and the whole of the Scriptures.

 

Being a phenomenon arising essentially from a particular historical and cultural situation, Gnosticism was not likely to outlast that situation long. The crisis for Gnosticism prob. came with the emergence of the genuinely Iranian, radically dualistic religion of Mani (d. a.d. 277), which was spreading in the Rom. empire from the 3rd cent. onward. Manicheism must have faced many Christian Gnostics with a crucial choice: it could not long be possible to occupy a middle ground between mainstream Christianity and the books of Mani.

 

6. The sources of Gnosticism. Until recent years the Gnostic writers were known almost entirely through the writings of their antagonists. Of these Irenaeus, Against Heresies, Hippolytus, Refutation of all Heresies, and Epiphanius, Panarion, provide extracts, often sizable, from Gnostic works. The last twenty years have seen the gradual publication of items from a Gnostic library discovered at Nag Hammadi in Egypt and containing Coptic tr. of works of very diverse character. These include as well many works further from the Christian tradition, and some Manichean ones, the Gospel of Truth of (prob.) Valentinus and a Gospel of Thomas consisting of sayings attributed to the risen Lord and including a number of Gnosticized variants on synoptic sayings. While there is much still to be done in the study of these documents, the conclusion which emerges so far is that the early fathers, for all their trenchancy of language, hardly give a misleading impression.

 

Bibliography H. E. W. Turner, The Pattern of Christian Truth (1954); R. Bultmann, Primitive Christianity in its Original Setting (Eng. tr. 1956); R. McL. Wilson, The Gnostic Problem (1958); R. M. Grant, Reader in Gnosticism (1961); H. Jonas, The Gnostic Religion, 2nd ed. (1963); R. M. Grant, Gnosticism and Early Christianity, 2nd ed. (1966); R. McL. Wilson, Gnosis and the New Testament (1968); W. Schmithals, The Office of Apostle in the Early Church (Eng. trs. 1971) 114-230.

Source: https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/encyclopedia-of-the-bible/Gnosticism

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Gnosticism – 4c. The revision of Christian theology

Sin and salvation.

Evil is associated with matter, ignorance, formlessness, distortion. Consequently salvation is to slough off defilement rather than to receive forgiveness for offenses. Salvation comes as illumination dispelling ignorance, triumphing over the material. The Gospel is principally a means of men knowing the truth; the cosmic bodies receive the same instruction.

Judgment and resurrection were a constant source of difficulty for those who sought immortality in escape from the body. Resurrection, and the whole eschatological dimension associated with it, is noticeably missing from Gnostic schemes.

The Church and Christian life.

Some schools divided mankind into three according to the predominant element in their constitutions—the material (who were unsavable), the “psychic” who could receive some purification, and the spiritual, the elite capable of receiving the deep mysteries. Naturally the third class were the Gnostics, the mass of Christians forming the second class. The church becomes the club of the illuminated not the society of the redeemed. The view that the material is the seat of evil, leads to asceticism, celibacy and vegetarianism in some systems, and paradoxically to license in others, where “liberation” from matter meant its effects were inconsequential.

Source: https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/encyclopedia-of-the-bible/Gnosticism

Col 2:1-4 For I want you to know how great a struggle I have on your behalf and for those who are at Laodicea, and for all those who have not personally seen my face, 2 that their hearts may be encouraged, having been knit together in love, and attaining to all the wealth that comes from the full assurance of understanding, resulting in a true knowledge of God’s mystery, that is, Christ Himself, 3 in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge. 4 I say this so that no one will delude you with persuasive argument.
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Gnosticism – 4b. The revision of Christian theology

Nature of authority.

The Ptolemy already mentioned tells his correspondent, “You will learn the order and the begetting of all these [aeons] if you are deemed worthy of knowing the apostolic tradition which we have received from a succession, together with the confirmation of all our words by the teaching of the Saviour.” That is, he is claiming access to a superior source of secret knowledge. Valentinian and other “right wing” Gnostics paid lip service to the same authority as the mainstream Church: the Lord and His apostles. They had to show that they possessed reliable knowledge conveyed by the apostles (and thus ultimately from the Lord) which other Christians did not. The Valentinians claimed a tradition from a disciple of Paul called Theudas; the Basilidians from Peter via one Glaukias, and from Matthias. More exotic groups often chose James the Lord’s brother as their source, or Thomas (Didymus, “the Twin,” being taken to be the Lord’s twin) as being very close to the person of the Savior. The now famous Gospel of Thomas (Logion 12) insinuates that Thomas is a source of tradition superior to Matthew and Peter, the apostles associated with the first two gospels.

Incarnation and atonement.

If God’s transcendence implies the impossibility of His contact with matter, how could God take a human body, still less suffer in one? There are several Gnostic answers, depending on the degree of closeness to the central Christian tradition. Some reject the idea of incarnation altogether: Christ was only an “appearance” of God in human form, He only seemed to suffer. Others spoke of the divine Logos resting on the righteous but human Jesus—but being withdrawn at the Passion (the cry of dereliction, Mark 15:34, was held to be evidence of this). Others again used the traditional language, but emphasized not the historical events of the incarnation, but the relations between the disordered elements of the Pleroma, which the incarnation righted. For Basilides the important fact seems to be that Jesus had within Himself all the elements of creation; His passion is related to the ordering of its confusion (Hippolytus Refutation 7.27). He is basically interested in the question, Whence comes evil? rather than the question, How is sin forgiven? Likewise Valentinus in the Gospel of Truth (discovered at Nag Hammadi) uses traditional language about the cross without finding a clear place for this very mundane event in his complex drama of redemption among the aeons.

Source: https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/encyclopedia-of-the-bible/Gnosticism

[Another point could be made that the Gnostics are on a quest to find answers to the enduring questions man has whereas Christianity has a complete and final answer in Jesus Christ.]

1 Cor 1:30 But by His doing you are in Christ Jesus, who became to us wisdom from God, and righteousness and sanctification, and redemption…
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Gnosticism – 4a. The revision of Christian theology

The doctrine of God.

God is conceived as remote from all the material creation. The gap between is filled by a hierarchy of intermediary beings, in a descending order of magnitude. These are aeons, usually linked in pairs or syzygies (usually male and female), and are collectively given the name “the pleroma” (fullness). The earliest may be the result of God’s creative act; the others emanate from them. There are different myths as to the origin of our world; but all agree that it was a mistake, an accident, the work of an ignorant being or the mischief of an antigod. One picture of the material universe is that of an abortion self-generated by the inordinate desire of a female aeon (Sophia, “wisdom”); and some systems attempt to reconcile this view with such passages as John 1:3 by describing the Logos in creation as giving form to the misshapen abortion, which thus combines the principles of good and evil. In other systems, of which the most influential was that of Marcion, creation is the work of a Demiurge, an inferior divinity.

The Old Testament.

Clearly such a scheme does not reflect the Creator/Vindicator God of the OT. Accordingly, teachers like Cerdo and Marcion frankly abandon the OT, and regard themselves as liberating the Church from the fetters of the Judaizers. Since one can only be really radical with the OT by being really radical with the NT, many of those who wished to keep contact with the apostolic writings were forced to try to accommodate the OT. A long, thoughtful letter from the Valentinian theologian Ptolemy (in Epiphanius, Panarion 33) offers a tripartite division of the OT: part is from God, part from Moses acting as law giver, part from the elders; part is eternal, if incomplete; part was temporary and is now abrogated; part is symbolical, and is now transformed.

Source: https://www.biblegateway.com/resources/encyclopedia-of-the-bible/Gnosticism

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Gnosticism – 3. The Gnostic Crux

3. The Gnostic crux.

The collision of Christian and Gr. assumptions directed attention to the origin of evil in the world. For those reared on Gr. assumptions this might be formulated as, How does the divinely originated soul become imprisoned in matter, and how can it escape? For teachers believing in the love and goodness of God these posed particular problems. The general answer is to give a mythological scheme, in which redemption becomes a drama played out among cosmic forces—the “principalities and powers” of the NT—the astral forces in a good deal of contemporary religion.

4. The revision of Christian theology.

The central Christian tradition represented in the apostles maintained the peculiar features of the Jewish faith in which it had been born: monotheistic, historical, eschatological, ethical, and exclusive. The Redeemer continued to be styled “Christ,” a direct tr. of the Heb. “Messsiah.” The Jewish concern with God’s interventions in human history was retained and enlarged—preaching concentrated, indeed, on the historical events of the life and death and resurrection of Jesus. Though the law was abandoned, the idea of a moral commitment directly watched over by God remained. The peculiarly Jewish belief in the resurrection and last judgment was retained, and the Jewish Scriptures continued to be read. And though the idea of a people of God defined by physical descent disappeared, the solidarity of a single “Israel of God,” in continuity with the OT Israel, meant the continuing consciousness of a single worshiping community, a “third race” alongside Jew and Gentile. Gnostic reformulation was bound to collide with all these elements.

Copied from: Gnosticism – Encyclopedia of The Bible – Bible Gateway

[Summary: Whence comes evil into our world?  The Gnostics devise mythological schmes whereas the Christians continue and add to the Jewish answer already given in Old Testament Scripture, all of which are rooted in historical events.]

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